Brown Recluse Spiders

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bella22
Brown Recluse Spiders
Ok, So ever since I learned about the Brown Recluse Spider I've been obsessed with reading about them and learning the damage a little spider could do to us. Here is some info. on Brown Recluse Spiders......

The common name, brown recluse spider, pertains to only one species, Loxosceles reclusa. The name refers to its color and habits. It is a reclusive creature that seeks and prefers seclusion. The brown recluse spider and ten additional species of Loxosceles are native to the United States. In addition, a few non-native species have become established in limited areas of the country. The brown recluse spider is found mainly in the central Midwestern states southward to the Gulf of Mexico (see map). Isolated cases in Ohio are likely attributable to this spider occasionally being transported in materials from other states. Although uncommon, there are more confirmed reports of Loxosceles rufescens (Mediterranean recluse) than the brown recluse in Ohio. It, too, is a human-associated species with similar habits and probably similar venom risks (unverified).

Bite Symptoms
The physical reaction to a brown recluse spider bite depends on the amount of venom injected and an individual's sensitivity to it. Some people are unaffected by a bite, whereas others experience immediate or delayed effects as the venom kills the tissues (necrosis) at the site of the bite. Many brown recluse bites cause just a little red mark that heals without event. The vast majority of brown recluse bites heal without severe scarring (http://spiders.ucr.edu/avoidbites.html).

Initially, the bite may feel like a pinprick or go unnoticed. Some may not be aware of the bite for 2 to 8 hours. Others feel a stinging sensation followed by intense pain. Infrequently, some victims experience general systemic reactions that may include restlessness, generalized itching, fever, chills, nausea, vomiting, or shock. A small white blister usually initially rises at the bite site surrounded by a swollen area. The affected area enlarges and becomes red, and the tissue is hard to the touch for some time. The lesion from a brown recluse spider bite is a dry, blue-gray or blue-white, irregular sinking patch with ragged edges and surrounding redness--termed the "red, white, and blue sign." The lesion usually is 1½ inches by 2¾ inches or smaller.

The bite of the brown recluse spider can result in a painful, deep wound that takes a long time to heal. Fatalities are extremely rare, but bites are most dangerous to young children, the elderly, and those in poor physical condition. When there is a severe reaction to the bite, the site can erupt into a "volcano lesion" (a hole in the flesh due to damaged, gangrenous tissue). The open wound may range from the size of an adult's thumbnail to the span of a hand. The dead tissue gradually sloughs away, exposing underlying tissues. The sunken, ulcerating sore may heal slowly up to 6 to 8 weeks. Full recovery may take several months and scarring may remain.

It is difficult for a physician to accurately diagnose a "brown recluse bite" based simply on wound characteristics. It is absolutely necessary to have the spider for a positive identification. Necrotic wounds can result from a variety of agents such as bacteria (Staphylococcus, "flesh-eating" Streptococcus, etc.), viruses, fungi, and arthropods (non-recluse spiders, centipedes, mites, ticks, wasps, bedbugs, kissing bugs, biting flies, etc.). Necrotic conditions also can be caused by vascular and lymphatic disorders, drug reactions, underlying diseases states, and a variety of other agents. An annotated list of conditions that could be mistaken for a brown recluse spider bite is available at http://www.ama-assn.org/amednews/2002/08/05/hlsa0805.htm. Misdiagnosis of lesions as brown recluse bites can delay appropriate care.

First Aid
If bitten, remain calm, and immediately seek medical attention (contact your physician, hospital and/or poison control center). Apply an ice pack directly to the bite area to relieve swelling and pain. Collect the spider (even a mangled specimen has diagnostic value), if possible, for positive identification by a spider expert. A plastic bag, small jar, or pill vial is useful and no preservative is necessary, but rubbing alcohol helps to preserve the spider.

An effective commercial antivenin is not available. The surgical removal of tissue was once standard procedure, but now this is thought to slow down wound healing. Some physicians administer high doses of cortisone-type hormones to combat hemolysis and other systemic complications. Treatment with oral dapsone (an antibiotic used mainly for leprosy) has been suggested to reduce the degree of tissue damage. However, an effective therapy has not yet been found in controlled studies.

Have any of you ever been bitten by a brown recluse spider? Do you know anyone who has been bitten by a Brown Recluse? If so, what happened, where, how did they/you recover?

   

bella22
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

OMG! No one here has encountered or know anyone who has encountered a Brown Recluse Spider?! Well be careful! This is a spider you should be afraid of and avoid at all costs!

-THE ONE that got away......

Hot2na
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

can you believe i've never seen one here? wolf spiders, yes! many.

Tuna ><((((*> the other white meat! I am Keeper Of The Whip!

bella22
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

And you prob. won't, they're not very common here, but have been seen and attacked here. Have you seen pictures of someone who has been bitten by one? Google the image, it's nasty!

-THE ONE that got away......

romanov1918
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

I have a bad, bad fear of spiders, especially brown or black big ones.  If ones ever gets too close to me or even on me, I will go nuts.......in Wikipedia, look up the "clock spider"....it is called that because it is hiding behind a wall clock and it is so big, its legs are hanging out......It is from Australia and is called the Huntsman Spider.  I will NEVER go to Australia.  

bella22
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

Good thing it's not poisonous or deadly like the Brown Recluse. When you see the B.R. spider bite you'll either get scared or grossed out....I couldn't stop looking at what it did to someone's thumb, weird I know, But I'm such a curious person!

-THE ONE that got away......

bella22
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

[quote=]

 OHHHHH RAISES HAND - ME ME ME!!!!!

In 99 I was bite by one.  I was at my moms house in her back yard by the pool and sitting in a plastic lawn chair and I guess there was one on it (under it).  I had my bathing suite on and well I felt something.  A bite.  It got me on my hip (high cut bathing suite).  First it looked like a mosquito bite with a red mark then it started to grow and get real hot.  Within a couple of hours it was the size of a pancake - the swollen area and HOT and red.  Off to the ER - a couple of hours a few shots and some strong meds and many follow up visits and it was fine.  I was lucky because some can be very nasty - guess it didn't get me too good but good enough to know I hate spiders.

 

[/quote]
Oh my!!!!!!!!!!! How scary! Good thing you went to the ER right away, some people put things off for so long that it only gets worse! I HATE spiders too! Did you take any pics of your bite?

-THE ONE that got away......

Cassandra0321
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

There is a reason that I stay away from creepy crawly things...A dear friend was out working in his yard and got bitten by a brown recluse.  He didn't know what had gotten him at the time.  Like others have said, the bite area swelled, became fevered looking and still he didn't think to much about it.  About 48 hours later he was found by a friend,unconscious in his tub...apparently he had been there for quite awhile.  He went by ambulance to the hospital and remained there for I think 3 days.  They told him he was VERY lucky to have survived...His reaction was a SEVERE one but please note any spider bite can be serious!  If ya see a brown recluse...run!!!!!!

C- 

The One, the Only The Super GOOBER GEEK!

bella22
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

[quote=Cassandra0321]

  They told him he was VERY lucky to have survived...His reaction was a SEVERE one but please note any spider bite can be serious!  If ya see a brown recluse...run!!!!!!

C- 

The One, the Only The Super GOOBER GEEK!

[/quote]

That's right, run or kill it so they don't produce eggs (if it's female). Wow your friend was very lucky!!!
-THE ONE that got away......

cibomatto69
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

I was bite by the brown recluse at work a few years ago and once I felt the "prick" my arm started to swell. I went up to my boss and showed him what happened and he went down to where I was working and collected the dead spider that I squished on the floor. He the rushed me to a hospital where the doctor told me it had been a brown recluse. By this time I started feeling really woozy and my arm burned and it felt like it was tightening  round my shoulder. He gave me a shot and then gave me some meds to take every day. I stayed at the hospital that evening because he was afraid I might go into shock, the next day he said I looked better and I went home. Afterwards the bite mark started to bruise and peel off, I have a huge scar on my arm because of that damn spider!

bella22
Re: Brown Recluse Spiders

OMG! this is obviously a serious matter that shouldn't be ignored! Thank God you went to the Hospital right away!!!

-THE ONE that got away......

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