Calculating Wavelength

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NickRx
Calculating Wavelength

I didn't know where to post this, but this seems like a good place

http://www.1728.com/freqwave.htm

Im trying to learn how to use antenna's with some of my projects, this site makes no sense to me, can someone help me/explain what all this stuff means XD

I want my antennas to reach at least 10 feet, I typed that into the calculator (I think that's what I'm supposed to do XD) and this is what it comes up with

A Wavelength of 10  Feet has a Frequency of
9.8357e+7 Hertz
9.8357e+4 KiloHertz
98.357 MegaHertz
& has a photon energy of 4.0677e-7 electron volts

is [(4.0677 X e) -7] the current I'm supposed to send to the antenna?

I didn't pay much attention to waves in school because I never though I would actually use them in any of my projects

   

   

hubby
Re: Calculating Antenna Wavelength

Your wavelength and your desired distance are two different things. So if you wanted your signal to radiate 10 feet, you would not enter 10feet for the wavelength.
That's about all i know.

Pembo210
Re: Calculating Wavelength

98.357 Megahertz would just be a frequency that you need to tune your broadcaster and receiver to in order for them to be able to communicate. The Mhz is just like the channel that you're on. You can use pretty much any frequency at that distance as long as the broadcaster and the receiver are set to the same.
Radio Spectrum list

What you need to figure is how many watts of power to put behind the broadcaster. 1 watt of power can transmit from .25 to 1 mile depending on topography and other electric interference, like power lines or other broadcasters. FM radio stations are in the 1,000's to 100,000 watt range while private broadcasters in the 10-100 watt range can transmit 3-5 miles.

This site (http://www.electrokits.com/) has alot of broadcasting and receiver parts.

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