Cats & Houseplants

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LadyCerridwen48
Cats & Houseplants

I know there are a TON of plants that are dangerous for pets to eat.  I'm wondering if anyone knows if Spearmint is on that list?  I've been growing numerous plants indoors for several weeks now.  Gwen recently discovered the spearmint.  She won't leave it alone now!!!  I moved it, she found it.  I put it up really high, sddenly she's Houdini, and can climb walls.  In another few weeks, I can just put the plant outside my back window, but in the meantime, I don't know if I need to keep trying to hide it from her, or if she can just eat a little bit of and and everything will be fine. 

Catnip is part of the mint family, which leads me to think spearmint should be safe.  However, Pennyroyal is also in the mint family, and I sure as heck won't be feeding that to her anytime soon, so I really don't know....

   

   

Almost Evil
Re: Cats & Houseplants

 Looks like Spearmint (all mints i guess) are perfectly fine for kitties! (and other pets)

Im thinkin bout growing a bit not for my cats. One of them has stinky kitty breath. eww!

 

"So, Lone Star, now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb. "

LadyCerridwen48
Re: Cats & Houseplants

Almost Evil wrote:

 Looks like Spearmint (all mints i guess) are perfectly fine for kitties! (and other pets)

Im thinkin bout growing a bit not for my cats. One of them has stinky kitty breath. eww!

 

"So, Lone Star, now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb. "

Well, Pennyroyal's a mint, and I know for sure it's not safe for pets.  It's a fantastic bug repellent, though.  For the time being, I found a shelf she can't get to (she's part Spiderman, I swear), but it's not getting enough sunlight way up there.  I've seen more sites leaning towards it being safe, rather than unsafe, though, so I think we'll see what happens.  Fresher breath may not be a bad thing!

 

"Which one of these words don't you understand?  Talking to you is like clapping with one hand."

CritterKeeper
Re: Cats & Houseplants

Spearmint is perfectly safe for Gwen. Let her chow down to her little kitty heart's content.

Be yourself...... Everyone else is taken!

ml833
Re: Cats & Houseplants

i've contacted the poison center directly with my ?s on this. the lists that are online all say different things about different plants. so i called my vet and they directed me to the poison center

Zeev
Re: Cats & Houseplants

Spearmint won't cause  vomiting, but it will however cause irritation to the cat's mouth, stomach, and possibly give her diarrhea.  Whether or not the plant is safe, it still is not a good idea to allow that cat to chew on a plant (even a little bit) ... it encourages bad behavior.  Until you can put the plant outside, I would recommend hanging it from a hook in the ceiling where she can't get to it.  Failing that I would invest in a squirt bottle and give her a good squirt of water & a firm "NO!" every time she gets near the plant ... hopefully that will teach/train her that chewing on the plant is bad and unacceptable.

Hope this helps.  :)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity." ~Unknown

LadyCerridwen48
Re: Cats & Houseplants

I think that would confuse her, as the catnip plant, and the cat grass are acceptable, even encouraged.  Since I started the cat grass (wheat grass and oat grass blend) her ridiculous vomiting has been reduced.  I'd like to think that if it burns her mouth, she'd be smart enough to stay away from it, but she's not very bright, and STILL hasn't learned to not lay behind the chair with wheels.  Honestly, the "habit" isn't an issue, I just don't want her eating it if it'll harm her.

 

"Which one of these words don't you understand?  Talking to you is like clapping with one hand."

Zeev
Re: Cats & Houseplants

 Ah yes, that would be confusing ... and unfortunately some cats will keep doing things, even it it hurts them; some don't learn very well.  ~LOL~  Then it looks like you'll need to invest in a plant hook to hang it from, so she can't get to it.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

"Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity." ~Unknown

Hello Cupcake
Re: Cats & Houseplants

Zeev wrote:

 Until you can put the plant outside, I would recommend hanging it from a hook in the ceiling where she can't get to it.

I agree.  That plant would become a hanging plant in my house.  She seems relentless though lol 

I just hope if you choose this option, Gwen doesn't find a way up there to get her daily fresh breath :)

LadyCerridwen48
Re: Cats & Houseplants

There are 2 reasons I'm hesitant to hang any plants.  First, I don't want to tempt Spider-Cat into figuring out how to climb my curtains.  Despite the fact that she's declawed, I'm pretty sure she can do it, she just doesn't realize it yet.  Second is, I rent, and don't think my landlord would appreciate holes in the woodwork.  So, as long as it's harmless, it's on the plant table with everything else, next to the grow-lamp.  She rediscovered it last night, snacked a little, and has left it mostly alone since.  She can't reach the good, middle leaves reserved for Mojitos, so, I'll share the rest. :)

 

"Which one of these words don't you understand?  Talking to you is like clapping with one hand."

ibcute81
Re: Cats & Houseplants

This is the list of what IS POISONOUS...link follows post.
Plants and Your Cat
Plants add the needed finishing touches to any decor. But, if you have a feline, that beautiful plant could become a deadly enemy.

Listed here are plants poisonous to cats that must be avoided if there are cats in your home. Note that lilies(*), in particular, are dangerous to cats. While in some cases, just parts of a plant (bark, leaves, seeds, berries, roots, tubers, spouts, green shells) might be poisonous, this list rules out the whole plant. If you must have any of them, keep them safely out of reach.

Should your feline friend eat part of a poisonous plant, rush the cat to your veterinarian as soon as possible. If you can, take the plant with you for ease of identification.
Plants Poisonous to Cats
Almond (Pits of)
Aloe Vera
Alocasia
Amaryllis
Apple (seeds)
Apple Leaf Croton
Apricot (Pits of)
Arrowgrass
Asparagus Fern
Autumn Crocus
Avacado (fuit and pit)
Azalea

Baby's Breath
Baneberry
Bayonet
Beargrass
Beech
Belladonna
Bird of Paradise
Bittersweet
Black-eyed Susan
Black Locust
Bleeding Heart
Bloodroot
Bluebonnet
Box
Boxwood
Branching Ivy
Buckeyes
Buddist Pine
Burning Bush
Buttercup

Cactus, Candelabra
Caladium
Calla Lily
Castor Bean
Ceriman
Charming Dieffenbachia
Cherry (pits, seeds & wilting leaves)
Cherry, most wild varieties
Cherry, ground
Cherry, Laurel
Chinaberry
Chinese Evergreen
Christmas Rose
Chrysanthemum
Cineria
Clematis
Cordatum
Coriaria
Cornflower
Corn Plant
Cornstalk Plant
Croton
Corydalis
Crocus, Autumn
Crown of Thorns
Cuban Laurel
Cutleaf Philodendron
Cycads
Cyclamen

Daffodil
Daphne
Datura
Deadly Nightshade
Death Camas
Devil's Ivy
Delphinium
Decentrea
Dieffenbachia
Dracaena Palm
Dragon Tree
Dumb Cane

Easter Lily *
Eggplant
Elaine
Elderberry

Elephant Ear
Emerald Feather
English Ivy
Eucalyptus
Euonymus
Evergreen

Ferns
Fiddle-leaf fig
Florida Beauty
Flax
Four O'Clock
Foxglove
Fruit Salad Plant

Geranium
German Ivy
Giant Dumb Cane
Glacier IvyGolden Chain
Gold Dieffenbachia
Gold Dust Dracaena
Golden Glow
Golden Pothos
Gopher Purge

Hahn's Self-Branching Ivy
Heartland Philodendron
Hellebore
Hemlock, Poison
Hemlock, Water
Henbane
Holly
Honeysuckle
Horsebeans
Horsebrush
Horse Chestnuts
Hurricane Plant
Hyacinth
Hydrangea

Indian Rubber Plant
Indian Tobacco
Iris
Iris Ivy

Jack in the Pulpit
Janet Craig Dracaena
Japanese Show Lily *
Java Beans
Jessamine
Jerusalem Cherry
Jimson Weed
Jonquil
Jungle Trumpets

Kalanchoe

Lacy Tree Philodendron
Lantana
Larkspur
Laurel
Lily
Lily Spider
Lily of the Valley
Locoweed
Lupine

Madagascar Dragon Tree
Marble Queen
Marigold
Marijuana
Mescal Bean
Mexican Breadfruit
Miniature Croton
Mistletoe
Mock Orange
Monkshood
Moonseed
Morning Glory
Mother-in Law's Tongue
Morning Glory
Mountain Laurel
Mushrooms

Narcissus
Needlepoint Ivy
Nephytis
Nightshade

Oleander
Onion
Oriental Lily *

Peace Lily
Peach (pits and wilting leaves)
Pencil Cactus
Peony
Periwinkle
Philodendron
Pimpernel
Plumosa Fern
Poinciana
Poinsettia (low toxicity)
Poison Hemlock
Poison Ivy
Poison Oak
Pokeweed
Poppy
Potato
Pothos
Precatory Bean
Primrose
Privet, Common

Red Emerald
Red Princess
Red-Margined Dracaena
Rhododendron
Rhubarb
Ribbon Plant
Rosemary Pea
Rubber Plant

Saddle Leaf Philodendron
Sago Palm
Satin Pothos
Schefflera
Scotch Broom
Silver Pothos
Skunk Cabbage
Snowdrops
Snow on the Mountain
Spotted Dumb Cane
Staggerweed
Star of Bethlehem
String of Pearls
Striped Dracaena
Sweetheart Ivy
Sweetpea
Swiss Cheese plant

Tansy Mustard
Taro Vine
Tiger Lily *
Tobacco
Tomato Plant (green fruit, stem and leaves)
Tree Philodendron
Tropic Snow Dieffenbachia
Tulip
Tung Tree

Virginia Creeper

Water Hemlock
Weeping Fig
Wild Call
Wisteria

Yews --
e.g. Japanese Yew
English Yew
Western Yew
American Yew

List compiled by Jeffrey D. Rakes
Reprinted from PET Magazine's Cat Care Guide, Summer 1987

Updated with the assistance of Dr. Jill Richardson,
ASPCA National Animal Poison Control Center, December 1997

http://www.cfainc.org/articles/plants.html

I B CUTE! Don't argue with me I know I'm cute!

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